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John Turturro

John Turturro

Birthday: 28 February 1957, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA
Birth Name: John Michael Turturro
Height: 184 cm

Highly talented, lightly built American actor who always looks unsettled and jumpy has become a favourite of cult/arthouse film aficionados with his compelling performances in a broad range of cinemat ...Show more

John Turturro
[2011, on Grace of My Heart (1996)] I loved, loved doing that movie. I would put that part as one of Show more [2011, on Grace of My Heart (1996)] I loved, loved doing that movie. I would put that part as one of the more successful parts I've ever played in a movie. I loved playing that role. I loved what the movie was about. I really liked working with Illeana Douglas, and I loved working with Allison Anders. I really regret that I haven't gotten to work with her again. I had a blast doing that movie. I met a guy who I based my speech pattern on - a guy who was in the music business, but he wasn't a music manager. I interviewed all these guys, and I found this one guy through a friend of mine, and he was just the key to the whole thing. Because it was well-written, but I was just trying to do something a little bit different, you know? And I basically did him in the movie. I really loved doing that movie. It's all about a lot of the music from when I was a little kid. Hide
I don't need to get the girl. I have the girl - I'm happily married. I don't need to get the girl. I have the girl - I'm happily married.
[2011, on The Nutcracker in 3D (2010) ] That was a whole huge makeup job. That was an interesting ex Show more [2011, on The Nutcracker in 3D (2010) ] That was a whole huge makeup job. That was an interesting experience. I'm kind of disappointed that the movie got chopped up a little bit, here and there. They didn't know what to do with it. I think when they originally tested it, boys liked it better than girls. It was a little too dark. But it was a really fun role, and I loved working with Elle Fanning and Andrey Konchalovskiy. He was a taskmaster, and we butted heads many days, but I still think he's a very talented guy. I was happy with what I did in the movie, but I think, originally, it was better. And we didn't shoot it in 3-D. That was something definitely disappointing for me because I felt like I was in the realm of doing something interesting. Hide
[2011, on working with Robert Redford on Quiz Show (1994)] Excellent. Excellent. Very good with phys Show more [2011, on working with Robert Redford on Quiz Show (1994)] Excellent. Excellent. Very good with physical behavior. We got along because I was cast way before anybody, and we worked really well together. He's a funny man. He's eccentric in his own way. Nobody knows that. But I do. He's got his own kind of off-humor. I really like him a lot. That's another person I wish I could work with again. Hide
Barton Fink is a guy who lives in his head; he's not a physical guy, so that's a very different kind Show more Barton Fink is a guy who lives in his head; he's not a physical guy, so that's a very different kind of thing for me. I see him as a guy full of himself at the beginning and, by the end, he's heading toward something more real. He'll be capable of more direct communication with someone. It's simplicity as an end result, rather than as a starting point. That's when you start to know something, versus pontificating about it. Hide
I didn't want to be an actor who played Italian thugs. I'm not even interested in those guys really, Show more I didn't want to be an actor who played Italian thugs. I'm not even interested in those guys really, unless it's a great part. And I knew that movies were predicated on how you look. But a few people gave me the opportunities to do other things, and I just took it and ran with it. Hide
[2011, on Five Corners (1987)] Well, that's a great part. John Patrick Shanley wrote it. The movie's Show more [2011, on Five Corners (1987)] Well, that's a great part. John Patrick Shanley wrote it. The movie's maybe a little uneven here or there, but there's a lot of good things in the movie, and it's a great part. The movie didn't get a lot of attention, but yeah, thank goodness enough people saw me in the movie, and it was a great role. It's still one of the better roles I've had. Absolutely. It's a really good part. It's hard to find. I wish I would have gotten to do more with John, because he could write for me really well, and he really fought for me to get that. That movie really helped me with filmmakers. I think if the movie would have done well, I would have gotten a lot more. Hide
[2011, on being directed by Robert De Niro in The Good Shepherd (2006)] He likes to do it a lot of t Show more [2011, on being directed by Robert De Niro in The Good Shepherd (2006)] He likes to do it a lot of times. A lot of times. He's good with physical stuff, too. But he likes to do a lot of takes. A lot of 'em. Sometimes, I would say, "Listen, that's it, I did it. I did it. Let's move on". But his thing is just that maybe if you do it more, you realize that you could do less. But we've known each other for a long time, and we have a nice relationship. I can fool around with him. A lot of people don't. But I do. Hide
Let's face it. The watercooler conversation is about what's on television. Let's face it. The watercooler conversation is about what's on television.
(2011, on his heritage) My background is southern Italian, but there's probably some French and Span Show more (2011, on his heritage) My background is southern Italian, but there's probably some French and Spanish in there. There could be some northern African, Greek, Turkish, you know. Everybody's in there. Hide
(2011, on his hair) Well, they said in Newsweek years ago that "John Turturro is to hair what Meryl Show more (2011, on his hair) Well, they said in Newsweek years ago that "John Turturro is to hair what Meryl Streep is to accents", or something like that. That was for Barton Fink (1991). It's funny, because my hair is really not that malleable, but I have done lots of crazy haircuts and had my hair straightened and this and that. I've also worn some wigs, and [Grace of My Heart (1996)] was actually a wig that I'd had made for another movie, Search and Destroy (1995). We remodeled it and, because it was long, we turned it up. That was a great job by the wig makers, the stylists. We used it long, short. So yes, hair is very important. Look at Donald J. Trump. Where would he be without his hair? Don King and Donald Trump are the prime examples. They've got the crowns. Hide
[2011, on making Monkeybone (2001)] All I can say is that it was very hard to get my voice that high Show more [2011, on making Monkeybone (2001)] All I can say is that it was very hard to get my voice that high. It was hard. It was definitely hard. But I think he's a very talented guy, Henry Selick. I couldn't figure out why he wanted me, but he was very patient with me. Hide
[2011, on working with Adam Sandler] Anger Management (2003) I kind of did - not as a favor, but he Show more [2011, on working with Adam Sandler] Anger Management (2003) I kind of did - not as a favor, but he wanted me because I think it made Jack Nicholson feel good that I was in the movie. I wasn't crazy about that role, but I had fun doing it. Then [You Don't Mess with the Zohan (2008)] Zohan was something Adam was talking to me about for years. I actually think the first hour of "Zohan", there's a lot of really funny things in the first hour. I don't think the second hour is good. But the first hour, I think Adam is really, really good in it. I actually think he can be really good. I saw him do that Judd Apatow film [Funny People (2009)], and maybe it's a little close to home or whatever, but I thought he was excellent. So I like Adam, but I have to balance these things, you know what I mean? Years ago, I did a movie called Brain Donors (1992), which was like a remake of A Night at the Opera (1935). The Zucker Brothers did it, I got cast in it, and then Paramount changed hands three times. Dennis Dugan directed it, who's the same guy who does a lot of [Sandler's] movies. If that movie would have just been released normally, I probably would have had to make a bunch of those sequels, because I signed up for that. That's one of the funniest parts I've had in movies, by the way. It was a farce, but there's a lot of really fun and clever things in that. But it depends what hits, or how it's released, or whatever. But Adam, I've known him since I did Saturday Night Live (1975). I think of all the things I did with him, I had the most fun doing Mr. Deeds (2002). I felt like that was the most complete thing I've done for him, as of yet. So I don't know. But now I'm feeling like I want to try to do some things that I want to do, even though the marketplace is crazy. So I'm trying to figure that out. Hide
[In a 1991 interview] My original goal was to just make a living. I've been fortunate. Now I'm tryin Show more [In a 1991 interview] My original goal was to just make a living. I've been fortunate. Now I'm trying to build on what I've done and try not to repeat myself. Hide
At the end of the day, your job is to keep people awake. That's your job. And then tell a story - if Show more At the end of the day, your job is to keep people awake. That's your job. And then tell a story - if people like it, that's what they remember. I've made movies that people love that never won anything, and they discovered later on, and that's a joy. That's what I always aspire towards. I always wanted to make a living doing interesting things. Hide
[2015 interview] Earlier on in my life, I worked with William Friedkin and Michael Cimino - that was Show more [2015 interview] Earlier on in my life, I worked with William Friedkin and Michael Cimino - that was a different world. Cocaine-driven, brutal, actors being handled different ways. It wasn't very gentle, and I didn't really like that. But I learned a lot; I leaned to speak up for myself. Hide
[2011, on being directed by Dennis Hopper in Catchfire (1990)] Hopper, you'd ask him a question, and Show more [2011, on being directed by Dennis Hopper in Catchfire (1990)] Hopper, you'd ask him a question, and he would rebel against himself, like, "Do whatever you wanna do! Whatever, man! Fuck 'em! Fuck 'em!" I was like, "But you're the director!" He'd be arguing with himself so you could have freedom. He liked to say "fuck" a lot. That was one of his directions: "fuck". But he'd say it in all different ways, like, "You fucking do this, and then you fuck it, man! And just fuck it! Fuck it, man! Just fucking fuck it!" I remember Joe Pesci turned to me and said, "Man, that's directing". But I got along with him really well. Every time I'd come up with an idea, it'd be, "Just fucking do it!" And I'd say, "Yeah, but I gotta check with you right? You're the director". And he'd just go, "Fuck 'em!" It was pretty crazy. Hide
I mean usually with movies, if you're dark, you're a bad guy. That's it. I turned down a million bad Show more I mean usually with movies, if you're dark, you're a bad guy. That's it. I turned down a million bad guy things. Hide
[2011, on La tregua (1997) (aka The Truce)] That was a great experience working with Francesco Rosi, Show more [2011, on La tregua (1997) (aka The Truce)] That was a great experience working with Francesco Rosi, who's been a dear friend of mine for a long time. I spent years working on that, just reading all the material over and over and over again. It was like studying someone, like if you went to college and you were studying a certain kind of literature, even though I was doing a lot of other things at the same time. It was one of the great experiences of my life, working with Rosi, because he's made films and worked with Gian Maria Volontè, who I think was one of the great actors. Those are the things that I always wanted to do and to be involved in. To work on an adaptation of a great writer with a great director was a really special experience for me. Hide
John Turturro John Turturro'S roles
Paulie Carbone
Paulie Carbone

Carl Cody
Carl Cody

Frankie Carbo
Frankie Carbo

Jesus Quintana
Jesus Quintana

Det. Larry Mazilli
Det. Larry Mazilli

Abner Doubleday
Abner Doubleday

Fioravante
Fioravante

Pino
Pino

Ray Brocco
Ray Brocco

Camonetti
Camonetti

Bernie Bernbaum
Bernie Bernbaum

Emilio Lopez
Emilio Lopez

Agent Simmons
Agent Simmons

Sean Armstrong
Sean Armstrong

Alan
Alan

Chuck
Chuck

Harvey the Black Dog
Harvey the Black Dog

Writer
Writer

Dr. Bill Perlman
Dr. Bill Perlman

Barton Fink
Barton Fink

Mouse King
Mouse King

Detective Antonio 'Tony' Ricci
Detective Antonio 'Tony' Ricci

Jim
Jim

Pharaoh Seti I
Pharaoh Seti I

Harvey Brickman
Harvey Brickman

Herbie Stempel
Herbie Stempel

John Shooter
John Shooter

Ambrose Monk
Ambrose Monk

Francesco Bernoulli
Francesco Bernoulli

Pete Hogwallop
Pete Hogwallop

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